Do You Feed Your Kids “Kid Food”?

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happy young family have healthy breakfast at kitchen with red details on bright morning light

Do you feed your kiddos “kid food”?  I know I definitely do sometimes – when I’m too exhausted to do anything else but order in! But I do have to say, I do encourage my kids to try anything and everything, and when we do go out, I encourage them to try new things – even if it isn’t on the kids menu.  According to the National Institutes of Health, on any given day one-third of children and 41 percent of teens eat from a fast-food restaurant. They also report that the restaurant meals often served to kids contain too many calories. The typical “kid food” being offered tends to usually include chicken nuggets, fries, macaroni and cheese, burgers, and pizza. The problem is that these meals often provide empty calories and don’t provide enough nutrition. They also keep the kids wanting the same types of foods at home, with parents often providing them. One expert, Doctor Yum, says it’s time to ditch the “kid food” and start giving kids better options.

“Most food is kid-friendly. Kids just need to learn how to eat it,” says Dr. Nimali Fernando, a Fredericksburg, Virginia-based pediatrician who founded The Doctor Yum Project. “Kids who are taught healthy eating habits, which include eating a variety of healthy foods, will be far better off now and in the long run. They will be learning healthy habits that will last a lifetime.”

Here are 6 reasons to ditch the pizza and pouches and get your kids back to real food:

  • Kids can learn to eat real food. Most of us parents overestimate the amount of food children need. Therefore when a toddler takes two bites of their entree, parents may feel defeated instead of realizing they may have eaten enough. Parents then may be more likely to reach for those kid-friendly, addictive snacks (like crackers and gummy snacks) to fill their child’s belly.  It should be no surprise that grazing-style eating, where hunger does not fully develop, leads to a poor appetite at mealtime. Parents should continue to provide opportunities to practice eating healthy foods, and have realistic expectations for what their child should eat. With enough practice kids will get used to a healthy array of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Check with your pediatrician to see if your child is meeting expectations for growth to ensure his food intake is on track.
  • Restaurant kids meals are a waste of money. When eating out, say no to kid’s meals, which are usually variations on the same “kid-friendly” foods like pizza, chicken nuggets, and sweet drinks. Most of these menus have little to no vegetables or fruit. They may be belly fillers and provide calories but little added nutritional value for your dollar. Instead, order a healthy similarly priced appetizer and/or share your entree with your little one (restaurant meals are so oversized that chances are good that the serving is too big for you anyway). Alternatively, order a few entrees “family style” and ask the server to bring extra plates for whole family to sample. This encourages kids to be adventurous and get used to trying new foods.
  • Kid-friendly foods are misleading.  Recent studies of toddler foods show that many actually have more sugar and salt than what is recommended by experts. Food companies know that parents worry about nutrition, and know the buzzwords to attract those worried parents. It’s easy to make food choices based on the promise of “more protein” or “high in calcium.”  But reading the nutrition label (on the back of the box, not the front) will give you the big picture on whether a food is right for your child. Is there an abundance of additives and preservatives? Are the ingredients recognizable and safe? How much sugar is added? Think about the whole foods that might be used to get the same benefit (like a handful of nuts for protein instead of a protein bar).
  • Kids need real food to develop and thrive. While pizza and macaroni and cheese may fill a child’s belly, kids need fruits, vegetables and whole grains to provide the necessary, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (plant nutrients) for optimal growth and development.  Furthermore, an important part of a child’s development is their oral motor skills, those functions of the mouth (lips, tongue, teeth and palate) that allow for speech, safe feeding and swallowing. Many kid-friendly foods are soft and easy to eat and don’t encourage development of those skills. Relying too heavily on these foods (like soft chicken nuggets and pouches with soft purées) can allow kids to lag behind in oral motor development and may lead to picky eating.
  • You don’t have time to be a short order cook. Making two or three meals to satisfy everyone’s preferences is exhausting and can lead to cooking burnout. Teach kids to eat what you are eating to save time and money and to encourage the spirit of adventurous eating. This can be done from the earliest bites of solid food. Instead of relying on store-bought baby food exclusively, find ways to make your meals into healthy baby food. Check out the Doctor Yum Project’s kid-tested, pediatrician approved recipes on doctoryum.org. Many of them have a “baby food shortcut” which shows families how to adapt a family meal and make a meal for a baby along the way. Eating in this way from a young age can avoid that picky eater trap and lead to a path to adventurous eating for a lifetime.
  • Nutrition shouldn’t be hidden, so stop hiding the veggies.  Kids that are very hesitant eaters may be benefit from a few hidden vegetables as they gain confidence in food, but in general parents should try to help kids learn to love healthy foods without hiding them. While hidden veggies may help nutritionally, the kids may not gain an understanding that vegetables can be delicious, so they may still try to avoid them when they are visible. Get kids loving their veggies by leading by example, preparing them together, growing a garden, and visiting a farmers market where they can pick out a couple of things to try. The more variety they are exposed to and realize that they enjoy, the better the eating habits will be.

“If kids can get involved in the food process, from shopping to preparing it, and they can learn about why eating healthy is so important to them, they are more likely to do so,” adds Heidi DiEugenio, a director at the Doctor Yum Project. “This will help them avoid the obesity problems, chronic health issues, and they will have a better opportunity to live a healthier life throughout their adulthood.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, healthy eating habits can help children maintain a healthy weight, as well as reduce their risks of such conditions as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, iron deficiency, dental cavities, osteoporosis, and high blood pressure. An unhealthy diet, on the other hand, can lead to being overweight or obese, increase risks for certain types of cancer, and negatively affect overall health, cognitive development, and a child’s school performance.

I was happy to see that we follow A LOT of these tips!  I’ve never hidden veggies from my kids, and I’ve never cooked more than one meal.  Kids taste definitely become more sophisticated – just ask my 10 year old who LOVES beets and brussels sprouts!  You just never know what kids will love until you give them a chance to try!

Dr. Fernando and Heidi DiEugenio are two of the original founders of  The Doctor Yum Project, an organization with the mission of transforming the lives of families and communities by providing an understanding of the connection between food and overall health, as well as empowering them with the tools to live a healthy life. The project offers free online tools to help families make healthier meals, healthy cooking classes, child nutrition classes, cooking camps for kids, hands-on cooking instruction for families, first foods classes, and a teaching garden, They also offer a preschool nutrition curriculum, with 40 classrooms and almost 600 participating preschoolers. They are the go-to resource for families looking for answers on how make healthy, achievable dietary changes for a lifetime of good health.

Dr. Fernando, otherwise known as Dr. Yum, is a board-certified pediatrician. She is also the co-author of the book “Raising a Healthy, Happy Eater: A Parent’s Handbook” (The Experiment, October 2015). To learn more, visit the site at: www.doctoryum.org.

About The Doctor Yum Project
The Doctor Yum Project is a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to transforming the lives of families and communities by providing an understanding of the connection between food and overall health, as well as empowering them with the tools to live a healthy life. They offer a variety of community programs to help with those efforts. They are located in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and feature a free interactive website with family taste-tested healthy recipes and innovative tools to make cooking at home easier, an instructional kitchen and teaching garden for holding classes. To learn more, visit the site at: www.doctoryum.org.

Comments

  1. Leigh Anne Borders says

    We mistakenly did this with our first child thinking we knew what we were doing. When our second came along, we introduced him to everything and skipped the kid food. He is a better eater than the oldest.

  2. Emma Spellman says

    We share our meals with our toddlers at the restaurant because the kid’s meals are pricey and way too big for them. My 2-year-old is more adventurous than my four-year-old, and he will try anything once. My 4-year-old won’t eat anything green or smells it and won’t try it. We are starting our own garden this year, so I am hoping maybe that will help.

  3. Rebecca Swenor says

    This is a great post for any parent. I do believe that the kids menus at any restaurant can lead to the kids eat empty calories at home too especially those families always eating out. When my children were little they eat what we ate so we never had a problem with them eating any kind of veggies or fruits. I will have to share doctoryum.org with my nieces for there children. Thanks for sharing the information.

  4. Vrithi Pushkar says

    This is a great post. I try to feed my daughter a a good mix of healthy foods. But sometimes she get a treat of fries or nuggets. Luckily she loves her fruits and veggies.

  5. Victoria Heckstall says

    Food preferences are developed early in life, so offer variety. Likes and dislikes begin forming even when kids are babies. You may need to serve a new food a few different times for a child to accept it. Don’t force a child to eat, but offer a few bites. With older kids, ask them to try one bite.

  6. says

    I love trying out food especially if it’s our first time in that restaurant and I try to encourage my kids to do the same. These are great tips. Most of the time it’s better to order off of the kids menu.

  7. says

    These are all great tips to keep in mind for when we have kids. I hope to be a parent that instills the importance of nutrition in my children, but also make it fun/yummy at the same time!

  8. colleen wool says

    I have always made my kids the same food as us adults eat. It’s simply unaffordable to do it any other way.

  9. says

    While I am a VERY picky eater, I always had a three-bite rule for my kid. He always had to try something three times before he could say he didn’t like it. Boy did he hate me! lol.

  10. Stephanie Jeannot says

    I love this. It is so true that kids can love to eat real food. That is so real and apparent. Eating more at home or having salads more are excellent; even for adults

  11. says

    For lunch we might do hot dogs or guess what you would call kids food. Honestly we just fix really great tasting homemade food. We always had them help in the kitchen and they enjoyed eating what they helped make.

  12. Vera Bortolotto says

    I completely agree! The restaurant food for “kids” are all fried and so unhealthy. When we go out to eat I try to order some kind of chicken or meat so that they are not eating fried junk.

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